Editorial Policies

Focus and Scope

About the Australia and New Zealand Maritime Law Journal

The Australia and New Zealand Maritime Law Journal (ANZ Mar LJ) is the online incarnation of the Maritime Law Association of Australia and New Zealand Journal (MLAANZ Journal).

Like its predecessor, ANZ Mar LJ aims to publish significant and original works of scholarship that make new contributions to different fields of maritime law and commerce.

In 2014, Professor Craig Forrest succeeded Associate Professor Kate Lewins as General Editor. Since 2006, ANZ Mar LJ has been published online and is freely accessible to all who wish to visit the site. Users who register at the site will automatically be notified when a new journal issue is available.

The Editorial Board invites articles on any topic relevant to maritime areas of law and practice, such as shipping, law of the sea, marine insurance, offshore energy and other related fields. (Articles need not be limited to Australian and New Zealand law.) Short comments, book reviews and case notes are also welcomed. Students are invited to submit work of a sufficiently scholarly nature, which is subject to peer review. The choice of publication category lies with the Editors as does peer review.

Contributors may submit articles to be peer reviewed, or to be included in the non-refereed section. Articles submitted for publication in the peer reviewed section will be subject to a formal ‘double blind’ review by referees independent of the author.

Generally, articles should be between 8,000 to 10,000 words (excluding footnotes containing citations only), although longer submissions may be considered. Casenotes and other types of submissions will generally be shorter. The submission should be neither published, nor submitted for publication elsewhere. The Journal does not accept articles that have been, or will be, published elsewhere, either in identical or substantially similar form.

Citation and Style guidelines are available for download on the website at;

http://ssl.law.uq.edu.au/journals/index.php/maritimejournal

Authors are to submit their work in final form at the journal website (link above). The author must register at the website, then follow the steps to upload the submission to the website. The author will receive a confirming email once the process is complete.

The journal is published in two volumes per year, around July and December.

All enquiries can be directed to the General Editor Professor Craig Forrest, Director, Marine and Shipping Law Unit, TC Beirne School of Law, University of Queensland, S.Lucia, Brisbane Qld 4072 Australia Email: c.forrest@law.uq.edu.au

 

Section Policies

Editorial

Editors
  • Craig Forrest
Unchecked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Letters to the Editor

Editors
  • Craig Forrest
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Addresses

Editors
  • Craig Forrest
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Refereed Articles

Editors
  • Craig Forrest
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Morella Calder Memorial Prize Winning Essays

Editors
  • Craig Forrest
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Casenotes

Editors
  • Craig Forrest
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Student articles

Editors
  • Craig Forrest
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Digest of Journal Articles

Editors
  • Craig Forrest
Unchecked Open Submissions Unchecked Indexed Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Book Reviews

Editors
  • Craig Forrest
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Unchecked Peer Reviewed

New Developments, CMI Reports, Items of interest

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Whole issue

Editors
  • Craig Forrest
Unchecked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Frank Dethridge Memorial Address

as delivered at annual MLAANZ Conference

Editors
  • Craig Forrest
Unchecked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Unchecked Peer Reviewed

Conference proceedings

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed
 

Peer Review Process

Contributors may submit articles to be peer reviewed, or to be included in the non-refereed section. Those articles submitted for publication in the peer reviewed section will be subject to a formal ‘double blind’ review by referees independent of the author. This includes student articles.

From Student Paper to Scholarly Article
by Dr Bevan Marten, Victoria University of Wellington School of Law, NZULR Co-Editor.

The Starting Point
You have most likely got all the raw material you need, in the form of your existing essay. So to some extent you’ve done the “hard work” during the period of research and writing that led to the submission of your paper. With luck (ie not too many case/legislative developments between submission and publication), the revisions you need to make will be comparatively minor.

The first person to talk to about publication is your supervisor. Having given it a high mark, and perhaps having recommended it for publication in a journal, they have already indicated that they think it is a good student paper. Being familiar with the work, they should be happy to help you out with some suggestions about how to shape it into a scholarly article.

Fresh Eyes
If you can, take some time over this process, bearing in mind any editorial deadlines. By the time you have already gone through the drama of finalising and submitting a longer piece of writing for the purposes of your degree, it becomes quite hard to come back to the essay without the words all blurring into one big jumble. Coming back to it fresh after a holiday, or at least a week working on other tasks, can do wonders for the quality of your revisions.

Cut!
The ideal length for most scholarly articles is 8,000-10,000 words (excluding footnotes containing citations only). This means that while there is always the temptation to add more (especially as you’ll have left lots of material on the cutting room floor when getting your essay through its final stages), I would counsel against it unless your supervisor picked up on an area where your analysis needed fleshing out, or there was otherwise something missing (a new case perhaps).

The scholarly article serves a very different purpose from a piece of student writing. A good student paper will show your supervisor that you have done your research, understand the background of your subject-matter and can describe it accurately, are aware of side-issues that are not central to the paper, and that you have covered off all the bases necessary for that piece of assessment. The scholarly article is not like this. Your audience of educated lawyers already know the basics – they want to hear what YOU have to SAY about your subject. If they want the basics of the law of salvage they will go to a leading textbook and look it up. But if you have something new and interesting to say about, for example, limitation of liability in wreck removal, you could well be the first person to comment on a new development, or even to address a topic at all. Compare a leading textbook you relied on when composing the essay with the best of the articles you cited, and note how different they are as pieces of writing.
So take a long hard look at your paper – and I know it is really, really painful to do this when you have just spent months getting it together for submission – and think to yourself “what am I adding to the discussion?” You know where the law is currently “up to”, having done your research – so address what is new and interesting and controversial, and hone the basics down to the bare minimum necessary for an educated readership familiar with the basics of maritime law. Don’t go too far though – it should still be a stand-alone, comprehensible piece, even to a reader who is not an expert in that area of law. So the basic facts of key cases, for example, are helpful to retain.
Also consider which sections of your essay you can do away with altogether; perhaps there are loose strands that never really went anywhere, but which you knew your supervisor expected you to cover for the purposes of your assignment. Now that the paper is free from the restrictions placed on it by the law school context in which it was born, it can shed any extraneous themes and topics. Ideally you want an article with a strong thread – a thesis – that the reader can follow throughout its length. The central argument(s) you are putting forward are your article’s contribution.

Peer Review
The process outlined above can be enough of a struggle, but things can become even more daunting as your submission will be “peer reviewed”, ie evaluated by one or more anonymous referees as to its academic quality. If you are going down that route seek further guidance from your supervisor or another academic. Referees can be harsh, so you need to ensure you are submitting the best article you can.

 

Publication Frequency

Two issues of the journal will be published each year, in approximately June and December.